Roccat Kova AIMO review (PC)

We take a look at Roccat’s recent Kova Aimo gaming mouse – incorporating Roccat’s Aimo lighting technology into one of their classic mouse designs.

Computer mice have undergone quite a few changes since they went mainstream in the mid-eighties. The design back then was pretty much two buttons and a trackball-like system wherever you looked, but mice today has optical sensors and a scroll wheel has become the norm as well. Gaming mice have evolved even more, with mice like Roccat’s Nyth featuring up to 12 buttons just for your thumb’s use alone…

Those are very dedicated peripherals for a very specific use though, and a lot of successful designs have stuck with a familiar look and feel that they’ve kept for many years. A good example of this is Roccat’s Kova mouse, which has been consistently strong over a number of revisions. It’s elegant yet versatile design allows for both left- and right-handed use, and it’s a mold that feels comfortable even after longer periods of use.

roccat kova aimo2

What’s attractive about the Kova Aimo is that it sits comfortably in the mid-price range for gaming mice as well, with a superior design and feature set to budget models and a pretty competitive package when compared to the higher priced competitors. One of the premium features of the new Kova is the inclusion of RGB lighting, although it’s implementation here is subtle – the Aimo lighting (configurable through software) can only been seen on the scroll wheel and at the back of the mouse.

In its price range, it’s not surprising that the Kova Aimo is a wired mouse – though the braided cable never makes this an issue in terms of tangling up. Overall, this is a pretty standard (and proven) design without too many bells and whistles – the casing for the mouse is a hard plastic but everything feels very sturdy and definitely not too light.

Gameplay tests

Although the Kova is a plug and play solution, you can unlock extra features by installing Roccat’s Swarm software – a suite that manages all your Roccat hardware at once (meaning you can have Aimo color schemes where your mouse matches that of your Aimo keyboard, for instance). The application is a bit cumbersome to install, but does offer a full set of software features to help you tweak your experience.

roccat kova aimo3

Besides setting up your lighting scheme, Swarm can also be used to tweak the sensitivity of the Kova, both in terms of DPI settings and the way that your buttons and scroll wheel function. For those who aren’t always happy with a mouse’s performance “as-is”, Roccat has you covered with a good range of configuration options. Switching between various DPI values doesn’t have to happen through the app by the way – you can switch mid-game using a button located on the mouse itself (though Swarm helps in setting up how it works).

Macros for individual buttons are also supported, as are dedicated profiles for your favorite games. This really helps when you want to switch between games that require small, highly precise movements and titles where broad movements are better suited to the gameplay. For the latter scenario you’ll also need more space for your mouse to move around, so that’s something to consider. In our case, we used one of Roccat’s own Taito XXL surfaces – it may be oversized for just mouse use, but it also comfortably fits a gaming keyboard on it.

Conclusion

With its comfortable design and rich (software-enabled) feature set, the new Aimo model of Roccat’s Kova is a great choice – especially considering its price point. It doesn’t have the bells and whistles that some other mice have, but its neutral design makes it a good option for those looking for a general purpose gaming mouse.

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