Release roundup: Birthday of Midnight, Little Big Workshop & Pixel Ripped 1989

Today we’re highlighting a trio of new releases, including a brand new sequel in Birthday of Midnight and two ports: the PS4 version of Little Big Workshop and the Quest version of Pixel Ripped 1989.

Birthday of Midnight is out now on consoles

Published by Ratalaika Games and Petite Games, Birthday of Midnight is the next game in the “Midnight” series. It’s out for the Xbox One, PlayStation 4 and Nintendo Switch and we tested the PS4 version after previously having enjoyed the Midnight titles on the Vita.

The gameplay in Birthday of Midnight is once again familiar, and if you enjoyed the previous games you’ll feel right at home with this one. Your goal is to make sure your little fairy protagonist ends up in the hole in as few ‘shots’ as possible, in this golf-inspired 2D physics game. There are no golf clubs involved though, as you can just launch yourself in the direction you aim for – trying for that elusive hole in one or at least a better position to get to the hole.

birthday of midnight

Often, and especially in later levels, obstacles stand in your way, and jumping past a few spikes doesn’t guarantee success either – time your jump wrong or launch at the wrong angle and you might land on the next fatal scenery element a second later.

Featuring over 70 levels, Birthday of Midnight is every bit as addictive a little casual puzzler as the previous games were. It’s not too challenging and you should get an easy platinum trophy out of this one as well, but the most important part is that you’ll have fun getting there.

Little Big Workshop now available on consoles

A while ago, we reviewed HandyGames’ fun factory tycoon game Little Big Workshop. It was a hit when it released on Steam last year and developer Mirage Game Studios’ indie gem was recently ported to consoles.

Content-wise, you’re getting the same experience that PC owners got roughly a year ago, with the exception that you now have a gamepad as the primary controller rather than a mouse. The UI has remained mostly intact though, with a few shortcuts on screen to help you navigate the game’s menu structure while in the main game, but mostly unchained menus underneath.

little big workshop

As a result, Little Big Workshop on the PS4 controls a bit like using a gamepad to navigate a mouse pointer on the screen, which of course makes sense in a game like this. If that didn’t appeal you to in other tycoon-like games on consoles then you won’t fare much better here, but although I missed my mouse controls I certainly adapted quick and had fun with Little Big Workshop on the big television screen – if you missed out on the PC version and enjoy this type of game, this is worth a look.

Pixel Ripped 1989 can now be played on Oculus Quest

We reviewed Pixel Ripped 1995 a while ago, but the original game in the series still eluded Quest owners as it was released prior to the launch of Oculus’ standalone headset. Now, that’s been fixed, with something of a novel release as the game is available as a full length DLC package for Pixel Ripped 1995.

For those unfamiliar with the series – Pixel Ripped is all about transporting gamers back to the bygone eras of videogame history, with a variety of game modes that are heavily retro-inspired. While the 1995-release brought us back to the mid nineties and the dawn of 32-bit computing, the original game takes us to the end of the 1980s, where consoles like the NES still reigned supreme and home computers were popular as well, just before the launch of the Sega Mega Drive/Genesis and the Super Nintendo.

pixel ripped 1989

For a more in-depth look at the game play you can check out our review of the original PSVR version, and we were happy to see that the Quest versions holds up very well in the conversion. The game was originally built to simulate holding a retro handheld though, so playing with Touch controllers takes a little getting used to but quickly gets comfortable since this is a game designed to be played while sitting down.

Another quick remark is that, if you haven’t played 1995 yet, it could be a good idea to play the new 1989 DLC first to get a good sense of how the series evolved and move through time forward rather than backward. It’s a little counter-intuitive to start with the DLC and then play the ‘main’ game (1989 is a full game in its own right), but it’s a very small price to pay for being able to finally play both of the games in the series on the Quest.

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